I Failed

I like a bit of drama. Why else would I put the “F” word so declaratively in my title?

One of my favorite blogger buds, Bobbi, over at Fail, Laugh, Learn, and I are constantly discussing the idea of failure and how as a culture we’ve collectively decided it’s one of our biggest fears. In the past year or so I like to think we’ve cultivated this informal but sincere and rebellious pact to fail as much as possible. The idea being that if we are leaning into failing, unafraid, then we are leaning into life, and living it to the fullest extent that we can. If I’m failing a lot, it’s a good indication that I’m trying to do hard things. That’s a great feeling for me, it’s how I want to live my life. It means that when I set out to reach a goal, as long as I do the work, I’m gonna achieve something at the end, no matter the objective outcome.

Funnily enough, I don’t actually know if I did or didn’t make my goal for yesterday’s women’s Mini 10k in Central Park. I guess my “”A goal, as I told you guys here, was to finish in 55:25, which would give me an 8:55/mile pace. My “B” goal (which emerged as I was running yesterday) was just to average under a 9 minute mile. Officially, my time on the NYRR site is 56:04, with a pace of 9:02/mile. I made my hubs pull it up for me just seconds after I crossed the finish line. I was bummed cause I really thought I had it. Mostly because these were my Garmin Stats:

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I forgot to switch off the auto pause on my watch so it did pause VERY briefly when I walked slowly to chug some gatorade at one of the fueling stations. So that almost 5 seconds off the time seems right to me. What I’m not sure how to judge now is the distance. I took my time off of the site and declared to myself I had failed. Later on that day though, following a hashtag from the race, I noticed how many women had posted their watch stats as well. Every single one of them indicated that we had ran a minimum of .12 and up to .19 more than a 10k. More than 1/10 and almost 2/10 of a mile longer!

With that taken into consideration, it looks like I may have in fact reached my goal if we had actually run exactly 6.2 miles. That being said, I am aware that this happens in almost every event, and it’s almost impossible for them to ensure that everyone runs that exact distance. (I’ve just never had it this far off before!)

The conditions of the race were definitely not easy. I pride myself on loving the warm weather and thriving in it, but I have to admit that the 76 degree temp and very sunny skies at the start had a significant impact. For me, it’s not so much about “feeling” hot. I’m probably the most efficient sweater that I know so I cool down pretty quickly. The only issue with that is that I also tend to lose electrolytes at a rapid pace (as evidenced by the white crust all over my skin at the end of most runs.) I normally use salt tabs at each mile to balance this out, but while waiting in my corral for the race to start I realized that I had forgotten them. This is one of the first times I’ve run in the heat without them in about a year and I could definitely feel a difference. I felt fatigued and dehydrated in a way that I couldn’t seem to conquer. I chugged more water to try and compensate which left my stomach feeling bloated and eventually brought on a good deal of nausea.

I also could have probably used a good deal more hill work than I put in. I’ve run in Central Park a million times. I know there’s plenty of elevation. I just decided that 10k was not that far of a distance and I would be fine. It wasn’t until I got on the course yesterday that I remembered what makes it so tough. The hills are long and they are frequent. I reckon starting my hill repeat workouts 2 months ago instead of 3 weeks ago would have been pretty beneficial. The fact that so many of my fellow runners made it their strategy to walk them made the hills also very challenging mentally.

Speaking of my mental health–it had it’s ups and downs throughout the 6.32 miles. I started out in a really serene place. My hubs came with me and wore his hat that says “Go Cat!”, so I felt super loved and supported. I also felt emotional—in a good way–since the Women’s Mini 10k was the very first race I had ever run in NYC 8 years ago. That first mile or two I glided steadily down Central Park West and tried to energetically send love out to all of the women who may have been running a 10k for the very first time. After that though, I allowed my discomfort on the outside to really start to mess with my peace on the inside. I lost control of my breathing and was doing most of it in and out through my mouth, which not only dehydrates me, but also almost always elicits my fight or flight response. All I wanted was to not be where I was. I was squirming around like a 2 year old trying to free themselves of their mother’s grip at church. I just wanted out.

This state made each mile feel a lot longer and harder than it had to be. I’m finding that these shorter distances are almost more challenging for me mentally than the half and the full marathon. With longer distances I get to settle in and log a lot of miles at a more comfortable pace where I can easily control my breath. I’ve got plenty of time to progress and build and find synchronicity between my mind and my body. With the 5 and 10k, I haven’t got time to ease into anything. I think at this point, my mind just doesn’t yet believe that my body can sustain the pace I’m trying for. I think what it’s going to take to get it there is just more running and more racing. Evidence of this is the last quarter mile of this race. In all honesty, the whole final 1.32 miles felt awful, I didn’t think I was gonna make it. (In fact in an attempt to encourage one woman who was walking I said, “You’re gonna make it! I’m not sure I am going to, but I KNOW you are!”) I thought I might have to walk through the finish line, that’s how diminished I felt. But in that last quarter mile, something I still don’t know how to access consistently, kicked in. I gave it everything I had. I eyed this girl whose selfie taking had annoyed me the whole race, and I decided to beat her. I ran hard, almost violently. At the pique of this last stride I glanced at my watch and saw 7:30. Although I wanted to collapse across the finish line, I didn’t–and my first thought was–I wonder if I could have flown like that for the last half mile instead of the last quarter mile. Never satisfied. That’s the athlete I know and mostly love.

Not officially getting my time is fine by me. It leaves a little chip on my shoulder. I’m that much hungrier to meet and even exceed my goal the next time. In fact I got online this morning and signed up for another 10k in October. Same course. Cooler temps. Plenty of time to improve. Hill repeats, I’m coming for ya!

Thanks to all of you for your support in this little endeavor. It’s great to know that whether I meet my goals or not, I’ve got a wonderful community that just like me, looks at “failure” a little bit differently than the rest of the world.

Oh yeah, may have forgotten to mention one of the highlights of yesterday’s race (see pic #3). I got to meet a certain Superwoman…miss Boston 2018 herself!

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Such a thrill to meet Des Linden! She’s SO tiny! My crouching was an attempt to not tower over her and also not drip sweat on her since she had finished a good twenty minutes earlier!

 

 

67 thoughts on “I Failed

  1. Whether you failed or not, you’re right. I try to remember that when things don’t go exactly as I hoped they would. You had some great split times and you had some energy left for that final push – that’s definitely a success in my book. Though, to be honest, like you after my own race yesterday the first thing I said was “I could have ran that harder” because I did have so much energy left (I’m not even sore!). But lesson learned, right?

    I think that’s part of what I like about running – there are so many teeny tiny variables that you can tinker with to improve. Every run teaches you something. Every race shows you how tough you are. Every thought that flits through your mind during a run is something to examine. I tried to keep telling myself positive things yesterday during my race – nothing fancy just simple things like “wow, this is easy”, “that mile was fast!”, “that didn’t even feel like a hill!” and honestly they sort of starting becoming true, even if they really weren’t all the time. I felt like they were true and that’s what mattered. Last year my mentality for this race was “just don’t die” and I remember telling myself that the race would be REALLY hard. And I was right! This year I was like “I’ve got this” and I was right then too. The whole mental part of it fascinates me!!!

    Oh and unrelated – is that a new tattoo?!?! I thought it might be with the plastic still on it! I haven’t gotten one in a couple of years and the question of keeping it clean/covered while running did cross my mind!

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    1. I am inspired by your mental game M! I am going to start telling myself stuff like you did–faking it before i make it! It works in other things, why can’t it help me get up hill, right?!

      And yes, new tattoo! It’s my lion <3. I am running without anything on it now but when i did that race it was only like two days after! I have also been putting a good deal of sunscreen on it when i go out just cause it's so new!

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  2. Yes! There is that part of me afraid of failure, mainly because I want to be successful at whatever I’m taking on. But failure does breed success, I think. I’m stubborn enough to keep wanting to get it right! And wow, what a treat to meet her. I had no idea she was so little! And yeah, get after those hill repeats 😉

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    1. I can see that lady–your drive is clear in everything you put out there. I think that’s why someone like you though never really “fails”–cause you’re always gonna turn it into something positive or use it to get better for the next time. That is who I am trying to be as well!
      And OMG, like seriously, SO little–I am not sure she is 5 ft! I felt like I was going to knock her over! It’s funny though , I noticed how I hunched over to meet her down at her level in the photo and it made me realize that I have been doing this my whole life. I have a lot of friends who are shorter and I am always squunching down. Why do I do that? I’m thinking I should just stand tall–and just well, be tall. It’s a thought!

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      1. I do always try to turn things around, there is always a positive I think, in everything. Yes stand tall! I’m 6’0 and my mom and grandmother always told me to stand straight. Therefore I grew up not slouching into my much shorter friends. The older I’ve gotten, the more I’ve learned to own it. I wear crazy tall heels and dont care if I tower over people. I actually find it wildly empowering 😜 so throw your shoulders back and own your height!

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      2. I’m only about 5’10. I say “only” now that i have learned you are 6′, AND because I have a sister who is 6’2. She was a collegiate athlete and many of her friends are/were pro athletes, so they are all pretty tall. One of them is 6’7! A few years ago we were in Miami with a bunch of her girlfriends and we were at brunch and one of them said (referring to some other girl) “no she’s short, she’s like Cat’s height”. I was like, “listen bitches! in the real world, I AM tall, LOL–maybe not around you amazons, but i am tall!” Everyone was cracking up. I have to say i loved being around all of them though–i’ve never wanted to be short or any shorter than i am, but being around them made me want to be even taller, lol.

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  3. I like your take on “failure” – I used it with a client the other day who said she avoided so much because of the fear of failure. I also relate to your need to manipulate the numbers! I actually ran 26.44 miles according to my watch at the Edinburgh Marathon. I then recalculated my timings on the basis of Scots Miles (not used since the 18th century!) that are longer! You have a great way of bringing your race experiences to life, it is as if we are running with you (which, I suppose, in a way we are).

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    1. It’s so crazy how much so many of us are avoiding for fear of failure. It’s such a bad reason not to do things–such a bummer!

      And oh my, extra mileage during a marathon–isn’t that the worst? Everyone said at the end of my training (only ran my first last year) that the hard part was over. They were lying! That last 6 miles is torture! Any extra feels unbearable–pretty sure I was cursing the whole city once I had ran past the 26.2 on mine!

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      1. Haha! For the last 6 miles of the Brighton marathon you can see the pier that is close to the finish – BUT it never seemed to get any closer! It was such a hot day, and everyone was just relaxing on the seafront eating ice-cream and shouting “encouraging” words!

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  4. I love how we are all always so hard on ourselves. That is an amazing feat woman! The most I ever ran was a 5K and it was a night run with glow sticks and dancing so hardly serious haha. I get the perception of ‘failure’ though. I just had to go back to a serving job to support myself for writing and felt like the the biggest fraud. But it’s all part of a larger process! Congrats on a a great race.

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    1. Aww thanks lady. I am always amazed by people who do those color runs and obstacle courses and stuff-I so don’t have the patience for that!
      Also–no way you are a fraud–you’re so right, that’s a part of the process. Whenever I take what feels at the moment like a “step back” I have to remind myself of all the valuable things I’ve learned at every stage I’ve been at. I don’t believe there are mistakes. So if I’m right where I’m supposed to be, I look around and think, “what am I supposed to be learning from this right now, what am i getting here that I am going to use later on when I am doing something I really care about?” There’s value in it all.
      You’re not alone! I waited tables for ten years–and while i don’t do it anymore, I’m still not making a living doing what I love. It takes time, but I still believe!

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  5. Great job on your race! Summer races are always going to be harder because of the heat, physically and mentally. Also, don’t forget to factor in the distance it takes to constantly move around people, cross over to an aid station, etc. It does add up! So you technically hit your goal! Yippee! Fail? Hell no 😉

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    1. Thanks lady! Yeah it’s crazy how all those little jaunts at aid stations or moving around people like you say add up! You’re right, definitely not a fail-excited to try and improve even more for the next one for sure!

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  6. Great work Cat! Love your husband’s cap 😀 And awesome to meet Des! Was amazing to follow especially considering the conditions on the day, and great stories for both winners: Des being first American winner in a long time and Yuki Kawauchi being first Japanese winner in a long time.

    Experiencing failures is really beneficial, it shows you that you’re pushing yourself to the borders of your potential, and the closer you get to the borders, the more territory you’ll be comfortable in. More racing is going to help with that for sure, particularly on the shorter distances.

    Said this before but I really agree with you about the effort and exertion difference between “short distance” (which I mentally class as 10K and below) and long distance running. I’ve got a three mile race on Friday and I’m equal parts excited to see where my performance level is at and dreading the pain that its going to involve!

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    1. Thanks Paul! Yeah, my hubs is a sweetie, isn’t he?
      I agree, Boston was a huge thrill to watch this year both for the women’s and men’s winner, and for the conditions. Was very happy watching them from the comfort of my warm office! SO much respect for everyone that was out there!

      I like what you’ve said about pushing ourselves to the borders of our potential–if we keep pushing we widen those borders and can really venture into some territory we may have once thought was unreachable!

      I’m also glad you (and so many others) seem to concur on the pain of these shorter races. It really is such a different ballgame–different muscles we are using physically and mentally! Looking forward to hearing about how that 3 miler goes on Friday! x

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      1. Definitely. The approach I take is that I know there must be an upper limit to what I can do in all fields, but the important part is reaching that upper limit (or outer territory for the sake of my original metaphor :D), and not comparing it against others.

        I think the vast majority of people I meet who have run both long and short distances have said that the short ones are more painful. Its mostly track guys and gals who prefer the short!

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  7. I love your idea of leaning into failure so you lean into life!!
    Remember to be proud of yourself for showing up and completing the run- better than a lot of people out there!!!

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  8. Great job and so cool you met Desi! I had the same issue with the Springettsbury 10k this winter; the distance was off just enough to make me uncertain if I should count it as a legit time. Guess we just can’t get too hung up on those things though! I am guilty of not actually hill training per say anymore (always hated hill days in cross country and track in high school), but the majority of my non-rail trail runs always have decent hills in them so I find that tends to be enough physical and mental training to get me through races. I agree though when people are walking on hills it’s such a mental thing… your race experience reminds me of mine with the Spring Valley 4 miler last Nov. (minus the hot, humid weather) – I was wishing I had ran more hills to prepare for the final one and nearly everyone was walking on it AND I kept thinking it should feel easy to run 4 miles given I had ran a half marathon the previous month. Sometimes I think it really is more a challenge to run fast than it is to train and pace yourself for the longer races. Always something to be learned from each race though!

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    1. Thanks TN! Yeah you’re right, i think it’s good we don’t get too hung up on the distance or if we precisely met our goals–on to the next!
      For the marathon, I just always ran a LOT of bridges on my long runs (NYC has plenty of those!) and then also always hard part of those runs in either Prospect or Central Park, which both have significant hills, so I felt pretty prepared naturally in that way without actually doing hill repeats. Now that I am working at getting faster at the shorter distances, i have to make much more of an effort to put the work in cause I’m not automatically encountering those hills.

      My least favorite thing that happens in a race is what you just described here and what happened to me on Saturday–our minds “shoulding” us. 4 miles “should” be easy. AHHHH!! I need to find a way to mentally conquer that voice cause it’s really not helpful at all!

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  9. What a whirlwind of emotions you experienced Cat! First, congratulations for finishing
    having met your Goal # 2 (but it sounds like you really met your First Goal!) Yay you! You are so hard on yourself. Have a bit of self compassion girl. You are running, and running well. Setting goals and meeting them and Yay for signing up for the race in October with a plan to train on those hills. You’ve got this. I bet your next run in Central Park will bring back a ton of emotional responses, some positive and some “lets beat myself up some more” thoughts. Fight those suckers! They lie. Great pics of you, (your are beautiful) hubby (what a cutie) and our Boston Queen! She is our super-hero! Keep running girl! Hugs

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    1. You’re the sweetest lady, thank you so much for your encouragement. It’s interesting to hear someone else comment that I am hard on myself. I don’t deny that. I always have a mix of feelings about that– cause I don’t really want to be a person who’s not hard on themselves, it’s part of my drive. I guess finding that happy medium and like you say, having self-compassion, that’s the key. Thank you for that.
      And you’re right–I have been working A LOT lately on fighting negative thoughts. I told my hubs last night at dinner that now there is a new voice in my head–a third one! So I already had the negative voice, and then the voice that’s been combating those negative voices has gotten much louder. And now that that has happened, and I’ve actually been listening to the more positive voice, there is a third on chiming in that says, “hey, you’re really believing the stuff this positive voice is saying, is that okay? is this the new thing? can we really shut down the neg guy and go this way? What if the positive voice is lying?”
      Oy vey. Lots going on up there? Right, lol.
      I would just like to point out that I left this comment to you–knowing how understanding you are about mental health. I am sure there is someone else who might read this and think “all these voices, this bitch is crazy!” LOL. Thanks for being such an understanding sounding board! x

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      1. I’m honored you feel you can speak your truth. 😊 You’re not crazy…lol…your just admitting the fight that goes on in all of our heads! The voices we all hear…the more we (as in me too) can drown out the negative self talk and let the positive voices be the louder ones the better off we will be! Here’s to positive thoughts! 😄

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  10. Great writting Cat, and I like your attitude: you know what you need to meet your goal next time (hills!) and you’ve got time to nail it till October. I know what you mean when you say that in shorter races “your body doesn’t know if it can sustain the pace”. I get the same and I think more racing at these distances would do it: e.g. I seem much more comforabe during 5k races since I’ve started going to my local Parkrun more often, though I still had that sensation in a 10k earlier in the year (where I too peaked in the last half to quarter mile), as I don’t tend to race this distance as much.
    And I laughed about selfie girl, well done on beating her! 🙂

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    1. Thanks so much Leonard! Ha, it’s funny, I do know what i need for the next time–HILLS–but did I do them as scheduled today? NOPE! LOL. Truth be told I tweaked my back slightly so I thought I’d just go for a long slow run as I hadn’t done one of those in while. But yeah, definitely need to get to training on those bad boys!
      I wish we had Parkruns here, so much! I agree that running that regularly would make such a difference. I know they are slowly coming to the US, so I hope they arrive in my neck of the woods sooner or later! Would be great to get that practice in without having the pay heavy fees each time! But yeah, you are right–practice practice practice, that is what I need! I am actually excited to train in the heat for a few months and build up that muscle again as well!

      And yes, selfie girl. Oh my. This woman has no idea how i villainized her! LOL.
      Thanks Leonard–so nice to hear from you! x

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  11. You did great! Fantastic job. It’s so frustrating when your Garmin and the race don’t agree!! But if there are tall buildings or bridges around it can mess things up. And how cool that you got to meet Desi! And a new tattoo?? I had a good weekend, too. I ran my longest run since my injury, 13.3 trail miles,with a new friend. It was fabulous!

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    1. Aww, thanks PK! Yeah I think as others have mentioned it’s just the tangents and things that probably affected the distance–it seems like everyone’s was a little over–at least I wasn’t the only one!
      And yes, new tattoo ;). I got it just two days before, was very excited to have my first race with my lion ;).

      Sounds like a great weekend–so happy you had that amazing 13.3–that must have felt incredible!! Hope the week is going well for you as well! x

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  12. “I’m failing a lot, it’s a good indication that I’m trying to do hard things.” I love this!!! I’m working more and more on putting myself out there. It’s slow – I sometimes find myself quickly getting back to my comfort zone but growth comes from trying things, failing and trying things again.

    I have a pet peeve with races that are not measured properly. I don’t mind a few metres off but I have had one race that was 11 km instead of 10 km! I was so mad because I had trained so hard for a 10k and the race just never seemed to end!

    I agree 100% with your comments on the longer distance. You have time to really ease into it. By the time I’ve gotten comfortable in my 10k race, the finish line is already there! LOL!

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    1. Hey lady! Definitely–I find that the only way I grow is if I’m doing things that make me at least a little bit uncomfortable. I think what’s been good lately for me also is accepting that there are moments that I am okay not growing–at least for that time. I think sometimes we get so focused on stretching ourselves, but it can really be tiring to live in the stage where we are pushing ourselves ALL the time. I understand there might be some people who can do it–just don’t think I am one of them!
      1 whole km off is A LOT! I would be really frustrated as well. Honestly, I almost stopped during this race so if I had ANOTHER 3/10 of a mile to go I probably would have lost my shit, lol.

      I am getting more and more why you keep saying the half is your distance! There really is something to having that time to let yourself settle in. It’s great though because it’s still “short” enough that you can progress and push yourself as well!

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  13. It always sucks when you find you’ve run further than the race distance. That happened to me at my last half marathon. I also would have made my A goal time if only the distance wasn’t long, but hey I did make my B goal, so I was still happy with that. It’s always good to have A, B, and C goals for races! Great job at your race and that’s fun that you got to meet Desi. It seems like all of the elite women long distance runners are tiny like that.

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    1. You know what’s funny Donna, this also happened to me at the marathon, i think I was 1/10 or 2/10 longer. At that point I wanted to KILL someone, lol. How dare they make me run a foot longer than 26.2 miles! LOL. But i know i know, it’s tough, they do the best they can.
      And yes, meeting Des was really cool. Definitely all the elite women seem to be as thin and muscly but not quite as short! Seriously, she was like barely 5 feet it seemed! I felt like an absolute giant!

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  14. I think you’re absolutely right — the shorter races can be a major challenge, just because generally people try to run faster. I think my body is suited for slow and steady, so a 5K or a 10K almost makes me anxious because I try to run a little faster. And I always get a little annoyed when the race distance is different than my watch. Like you say, it happens but still — there’s something about seeing that official time and you want it to be correct! I ran a half marathon in 2017 that was a full 1/2-mile short! Clearly someone couldn’t measure distance, lol!

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    1. Hey Rachael! Yeah I think this is the first year I have really set my mind to “racing” 5 and 10ks. I have done a lot of them before but more for fun or just to get a good workout in or support some sort of cause. It’s really been enlightening to realize how much different (and harder!) running for pace is.
      It’s also crazy because it’s made me really respect and admire the fitness levels some people have. The girl I “beat” who was taking selfies the whole time–the reason I hated her was because while our pace was a struggle to maintain for me–it was so light for her that she was livestreaming it! She was definitely treating the run as a light jog where as I was really pushing myself–and we were running the same pace!

      And OMG–a half mile, are you kidding me? That’s SO long! That would really be frustrating, especially for everyone who had goals. I think it’s even more of a bummer that it was a half marathon cause I am sure there were a lot of first timers–it’s a big deal the first time you run one of those, you don’t want to be shortchanged!

      Thanks for chimin’ in girl, as always! x

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  15. Cat – even though ( or perhaps because ) I live and run in mostly chilly Scotland – I have a big fear of running in the heat. I totally understand what you mean about it being tougher to settle into these shorter races. As a fellow salty sweater – I would have been freaking out once I realised I did not have my salt tabs ( I have never tried these so should maybe investigate)

    I think once you have done longer distances you will always have that little doubt saying -‘ well how hard can it be – its only 6 miles and I ran a marathon :)) But when the negative thoughts start to creep in those 10 ks seem like a 100!
    But I guess it shows that different distances need different techniques or tactics, and don’t see it as failure because every race good or bad adds top experience.
    I am on a bit of a catch up reading the blogs I love and trying to get back into making writing a habit again – I really enjoy your blog and can relate to a lot of it.
    keep on writing, running and great pic
    Margaret
    PS if you ever need to do hill reps – visit my home town Edinburgh – its packed full of hills 🙂

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    1. Hey Margaret, so great to hear from you–and from a fellow salty sweater! It’s funny you said you would have freaked out once you realized you forgot your salt tabs. Mentally it was quite the feat for me not to at that moment. Very quickly I told myself-“alright, is there anything you can do about not having them? no? so don’t compound the situation by stressing out about it.” It was definitely tough!
      I also love the way you put how are minds work once we have done the much longer distances–they almost work against us with that it’s “only” 6 miles voice it always puts out there. I agree, that 6 can feel like 100. When I was running it, it really felt like one of the hardest things I had ever done. It’s interesting because besides one half marathon where I had a goal of getting in under the 2 hour mark, this is the first year where I’ve actually been “racing” 5 and 10ks instead of just running them, and it really is much harder trying to push yourself at these distances!
      Thank you so much for catching up with me here–I feel so honored and lucky to have you as a reader–I really always enjoy your thoughts and insights as well. PS-I will be in Edinburgh for the first time in 3 weeks! Absolutely CANNOT wait! I am not sure you saw it but I actually did a post on “what to do:Scotland” asking for tips and suggestions. If there is anything you want to contribute to that, please do!
      thanks Margaret!

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    1. Thanks C! I was so excited to meet Desi. In truth it was very brief, she was running out of there and was very sweet to stop for a pic with me especially as my hubs fumbled a bit with the camera. I too was really rooting for her in that race–she showed so much GRIT, it was so freakin’ inspiring!

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  16. OMG my other NYC running friend did this one, too, how cool is that!! And well done because it looks hot and I know it was hilly. I hate how races always measure over – my last official mara was 26.5 miles! That’s an ultra, right? Well done. And now I want my husband to get a Go Liz hat.

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    1. Liz have you been to NYC before? If you haven’t and you come can we run in Central Park together? I will show you these treacherous hills <3.
      And OMG, when the marathon is over–forget about it! Mine was only a 1/10 of a mile over but it still had me feeling crazy! 3/10 is A LOT!
      Also, your hubs should totally get a GO LIZ hat. Isn't it the sweetest? He showed it to me the morning of the marathon. He had had shirts made for my family and friends and then he made that hat. He's my favorite <3.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Ah, that’s so cute! Bless him. Best supporter ever!

        I’ve not been to NYC. I’m kind of holding off coming to the US again until all the people I know are allowed to travel there, if you know what I mean. But I will come and do your marathon which my other NYC friend and of course will go for a run in Central Park with you, too! Cari talks about the awful hills there, too!

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Hi Cat! Liz just linked me here and I’m about to follow your blog because NYC runners! Also 6.30 for me, the turn into the park got most of us as I have no idea how that tangent should be run. So awesome to have met Desi Linden! I didn’t stand on the line.
        I was also not ready for the weather. Queens looks to be similarly unpleasant. Look forward to “meeting” you.

        Liked by 2 people

      3. Hi Cari!! So nice to “meet” you as well ;). Liz is the best!
        Desi was so sweet cause I caught her when she was just getting out of there and she was nice enough to still stop and take a pic with me. The whole event was great, always is. I think this is the 3rd or 4th time I have run it. How about you? I saw some women wearing bibs that said it was their 24th or 25th one, very cool!
        So nice to get acquainted with another NYC runner!

        Liked by 1 person

      4. There was a woman in mine who has run it 33x. She’s the one with the judaism tats and bright colored hair who does most NYRR events. True ambassador. This was my second. Hope to one day earn my Crazy Legs. Are you doing Queens, Pride or Achilels? Maybe I’ll meet you there

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      5. I think the next one I am doing is in October–Grete’s Gallop! I don’t like to give NYRR too much of my money if I can help it ;). Putzing around doing some 5ks in prospect park and such on the cheap, but that’s probably it for me for a couple of months. Enjoy the summer!

        Like

    1. I don’t know if I knew you were a teacher Tara, awesome! Yeah it would be a strange feeling to just knock every goal out of the park. If I don’t have a little adversity in my running I wouldn’t be prepared for real life at all ;).

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Alright scientists–you gotta throw out all those complicated terms and get all fancy I see, lol! But no, I hear you–it is probably impossible to get everyone to run exactly the right distance. Definitely not blaming anyone–but when you are so gassed at the end, it is tough as hell to be like, “hey! should have been at the finish line already!!”
      PS-Haven’t read your post yet but I believe someone started marathon training today?! Yeah boy <3. Get it.

      Like

  17. Dustin Lovell

    It goes without saying, but we learn a lot more from failures than we do from successes. Unfortunately in this case, you might not have failed at all! Great read, and way to sign up for redemption immediately.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Definitely Dustin! I was just replying to Hanna that if I met all my goals on the first try I’d probably just be a miserable little shit to be around, lol! Lots to learn from not quite getting there. Next time I will be aiming for definitively making it in under the time so there is no question! It’s fun to have something to work on and know that there is in fact work you can do to get better . I love that.
      Hope you are trail running your little heart out up there ;).

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Dustin Lovell

        I am trail running my little heart out, indeed! This place is awesome.
        You’ll crush the next one, I’m positive. So many circumstances didn’t go your way last time and you were still just seconds away.

        Liked by 1 person

  18. Sorry you missed your goal! But it sounds like you did the best you could with the circumstances you were given! Just keep working at it, you will get there! I’m sure you will improve a lot this summer and crush your October race.

    Also, weaving around people in races and not running the tangents perfectly can add a surprising amount of distance in races. Even something as innocuous as veering to the side to grab Gatorade or high five spectators. That’s why I always plan for a little extra distance in races and calculate my goal pace based on that.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Hanna! Good to hear from you! Yeah honestly life would be a bit boring if I conquered every goal on the first try– I think I would get awfully full of myself and just think I was the shit, lol. Always a lot to learn in each race so this one really was good for me.
      It’s really crazy how those little things that you say can add on so much distance. It’s also kind of funny how if I wasn’t racing, another 1/10 of a mile would not feel like a big deal at all. But when you are really pushing it and giving it your all, that extra bit can really feel quite excruciating!
      I’ve never known anyone who calculates their goal pace and incorporates running extra–you are on it!
      How’s your running and everything else going? I am hoping you have had a similar Spring as we have–lots of cool beautiful running weather–I know you are not a fan of the heat!

      Like

  19. Great post Cat. I’m always looking at my running and it does seem like the shorter distances are tough. So much body scanning during the course, and then it’s over. But it sounds like you’re eying the next challenge with a new attitude. Can’t wait to see what you do next!

    Liked by 1 person

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